Issue 4 call for papers: creative approaches to assessment and quality assurance

Welcome to all our JUICE readers! I hope you're managing to stay safe and well during these uncertain times. Here at the JUICE headquarters, we're making preparations for our next issue which will focus on creative approaches to assessment and quality assurance. If you're working with students in creative disciplines and would like to share …

Democratic Assessment: Using a students-as-partners approach to re-think assessment in Consumer Behaviour

Abstract This research aims to investigate and evaluate the introduction of students as partners approach to assessment design in Consumer Behaviour. The more democratic approach reflects more accurately the needs of the professional environment that these students hope to enter. I chose to use an action research methodology to intervene in my teaching and assessment …

How might autobiography be useful in addressing the problems of gendered assessment?

Abstract As UK universities undergo unprecedented internationalisation, they are struggling to shape a plethora of cultural and social capitals into an educational environment that is fair and equitable for all. With existing concepts of social justice proving adequate, lecturers seek new interpretative models of inclusivity. This article questions whether present-day assessments somehow mirror the patriarchal …

Championing GradeMark for Assessment and Feedback in Film Production

This article focuses on the development of a community of assessment practice which aimed to ensure that all assessors were consistent with their assessment decisions. The community sought to enable students and assessors to be active participants in a feedback loop, and this research investigated the role that the online feedback tool Grademark could play …

What is wrong with Eisner’s theory of connoisseurship for assessment in the arts – and why

Elliot Einser’s theory of connoisseurship has been influential in the discourse around assessment of arts disciplines for forty years – and still is. It claims that judgments should be based on the fact that assessors are like connoisseurs: able to discern, discriminate and thereby identify good work, as well as being able to explain the …